Pope Francis excommunicates Australian priest

Pope Francis issued his first excommunication since become Pope in March (AP Photo/Riccardo De Luca)Pope Francis issued his first excommunication since become Pope in March (AP Photo/Riccardo De Luca)

An Australian priest who supports the ordination of women has been excommunicated by Pope Francis.

In the first such excommunication since the new pontiff took office Fr Greg Reynolds was dismissed in a letter from the Archbishop of Melbourne Denis Hart, which stated that “the decision by Pope Francis to dismiss Fr Reynolds from the clerical state and to declare his automatic excommunication has been made because of his public teaching on the ordination of women contrary to the teaching of the Church and his public celebration of the Eucharist when he did not hold faculties to act publicly as a priest.”

Archbishop Hart also told other priests in the archdiocese by letter that Fr Reynolds’s excommunication was “because of his publicteaching on the ordination of women”, which are grounds for automatic excommunication.

Fr Reynolds is also a supporter of same-sex marriage and has attended rallies in favour of changing the definition of marriage. He has even reportedly presided at same-sex ceremonies.

He told National Catholic Reporter: “I am very surprised that this order has come under his watch; it seems so inconsistent with everything else he has said and done.”

In August 2011 Fr Reynolds resigned his position as a priest at two rural parishes and, after Archbishop Hart removed his priestly faculties, he founded Inclusive Catholics, a pro-female ordination and gay marriage group.

Australian media also reported that in August 2012 he was present at a Mass where a dog had received Communion, which Fr Reynolds said he was not aware of until after the incident.

That month Archbishop Hart wrote to him warning that if he continuedto act publicly as a priest he would “be forced to take further canonical action for the good of the Church”.

Source: CatholicHerald.co.uk  : 27 September 2013

Be professional, shun gossip, Pope tells Vatican staff

Pope Francis . 1

A
VATICAN CITY: Pope Francis on Saturday told Vaticanadministrators, who were dogged by infighting and allegations of corruption during the papacy of his predecessor, to be humble professionals and “conscientious objectors” to gossip. “When professionalism is lacking, there is a slow drift downwards towards mediocrity,” Francis said in his first Christmas greetings to the members of the Roman Catholic Church’s central administration, known as the Curia.

He told the cardinals, bishops, monsignors and lay people who work in the various Vatican departments that administer the 1.2 billion-member Church that they should always strive for “professionalism and service”. When he was elected in March, Francis inherited a Curia in disarray and still reeling from the ” Vatileaks” scandal, in which documents stolen from former Pope Benedict’s office alleged corruption and petty infighting among monsignors.

Benedict, who became the first pope in 600 years to resign, was also tainted by reports in the Italian media of a so-called “gay lobby” in the Curia that used blackmail against others.

In his address, Francis said he wanted the Curia to turn a page. “Holiness, in the Curia, also means conscientious objection to gossip,” he said, and, departing from his prepared speech, added that there were also “saints” working in the Vatican.

Reuters | Dec 22, 2013, 05.35 AM IST

 

Cardinal Gracias speaks out against ban on homosexuality

Cardinal Gracias says criminalization is wrong.

Cardinal Oswald Gracias, Archbishop of Mumbai and president of the Episcopal Conference of India, said that the Church has “never considered gay people criminals,” after the Supreme Court of India restored a law banning homosexual acts.

According to reports, Cardinal Gracias, a member of the Council of Cardinals advising Pope Francis on Curial reform, said “the Catholic Church has never been opposed to the decriminalisation of homosexuality, because we have never considered gay people criminals.”

“As Christians, we express our full respect for homosexuals. The Catholic Church is opposed to the legalisation of gay marriage, but teaches that homosexuals have the same dignity of every human being and condemns all forms of unjust discrimination, harassment or abuse,” Cardinal Gracias said.

India’s Supreme Court overturned a decision taken by the High Court of Delhi in 2009, which had decriminalised homosexual acts. The court said it was up to parliament to legislate on the issue. According to Section 377, a 153-year-old colonial law, a same-sex relationship is an “unnatural offence” and punishable by a 10-year jail term.

Source: Catholic Herald

 

 

Second session of Council of Cardinal’s meetings: Pope Francis participates

This morning, 3 December, Pope Francis met with the Council of Cardinals, the group of eight cardinals assisting in the governance of the universal Church and examining a revision of the Apostolic Constitution Pastor bonus on the Roman Curia. Fr Federico Lombardi, Director of the Holy See Press Office, announced this in a briefing with journalists to explain the second session of the Cardinal’s meetings which will be taking place at the Vatican until Thursday, 5 December. The cardinals’ first session was held from 1 to 3 October. On the day’s agenda was “a thorough examination of the Roman Curia, which began with a reflection on the dicasteries”, starting with the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments. Fr Lombardi pointed out that “it will be a matter of readjusting: we want to go in depth. This is not a marginal improvement, but a substantial revision” of Pastor bonus in order to reach a new Apostolic Constitution on the Roman Curia. After having concelebrated at morning Mass with the Pope in the Chapel of Santa Marta, the small group, along with their secretary Bishop Marcello Semeraro, met in a room near the chapel. The agenda includes morning sessions from 9 am to 12:30 pm and from 4 to 7 pm. Fr Lombardi said that the tasks have been divided among the Cardinals based on personal experience, but the responsibility of making decisions is considered to be common and shared. Since the October session, the eight cardinals have collected extensive documentation and gathered other points of view, participating in meetings of their bishops’ conferences.

Source: L’Osservatore Romano

December 4, 2013
[tags: Pope Francis]
The cardinal Cláudio Hummes, new prefect of th...

The cardinal Cláudio Hummes, new prefect of the Congregation for the Clergy, Roman Curia. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Laity Speaks of Difference, SILENT VOICE has made to his Parish: Pope Francis and Economy.

 

INPUT FROM A SILENT VOICE READER.

Hi Greg,

The article below was published in the Business Standard and Reuters during the last week.

Besides, I have to express my gratitude to you and your work for a great transformation of the ‘Our Lady of Egypt Parish’ Kalina. The team is lead by Fr Harry Vas, a person deeply rooted in scripture (I once complimented him that he preaches like a protestant preacher – so good is his knowledge of the Word). His old friend Fr Andrew on the staff and especially the younger clergy has brought life and a strong sense of ethics to the working of the parish. I do not believe that the Lord can be effectively preached in an atmosphere of compromised ethics – it is clear His work is done at Kalina.

The pews and collection box are proof of the good work. I pray that this remains as a permanent testimony to what can and should be done in evangelising our own. And i pray for your work, family and self. Do keep up your good work.

Warm regards and the Lord’s blessings,

Naveen

OUR LADY OF EGYPT CHURCH, KALINA

OUR LADY OF EGYPT CHURCH, KALINA.

*****************************

Article in Business Standard and Reuters:

Wall Street bigwigs often lean economically right and socially left. In what looks like a manifesto for his papacy, Pope Francis takes the opposite stance. He might not, however, object to the relatively uncommercialized American Thanksgiving holiday. And over their turkey on Thursday, the rich might ponder a financial system that the pope says “rules rather than serves.”

Francis’ skepticism of free markets and concern about the absence of ethics in finance and economics were shared by his predecessor, Benedict XVI. But Francis’ simple style and consistent rejection of the traditional trappings of office lend his words particular weight. He rails against inequality and “the idolatry of money and the dictatorship of an impersonal economy lacking a truly human purpose.” Though Francis is guided by his Christianity, no particular religion is needed to agree that pure capitalism, whatever its big-picture merits, leaves many people marginalized.

There are some unarguable remedies mentioned in Francis’ so-called apostolic exhortation, including the rich helping the poor and initiatives to improve healthcare and education. The Catholic Church already does some of this. The Economist estimated in 2010 that the church and related entities like hospitals and schools spent around $170 billion a year in the United States, and that America accounted for as much as 60 percent of the church’s global wealth.

Francis probably expects more from his church. End-2012 cash deposits of 4.1 billion euros and portfolios under management worth 6.3 billion euros at the Istituto per le Opere di Religione, the Vatican bank which recently released an annual report for the first time, must represent only a fraction of the church’s worldwide assets. It’s easy to imagine the Holy See could rival the efforts of, say, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation with its $40 billion endowment if it corralled its resources.

The pontiff certainly wants more from governments and ordinary people. As well-fed American families give thanks, debate over the political implications of his advocacy of solidarity and shared responsibility may be best avoided. But recalling that the Thanksgiving holiday’s origins relate to collective effort meeting the basic needs of a human community, not to financial success, would at least be a nod in Francis’ direction.

 

 

« Older entries

%d bloggers like this: