Advice for parents when their children are unsettled at Mass

Rebloged : Bridges and Tangents

 

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It’s a common question: what do you do at Mass when your children are
unsettled – babies crying, toddlers toddling off in random directions,
younger children talking or fighting or banging toy tanks and fire
engines, older children perhaps reluctant to be there. I collated a few
suggestions in the Ten Ten Parents Booklet last year.

 

A priest friend of mine, who works in a large parish just outside
London, has been mulling over these things. After discussions with
parents, parishioners, clergy and the parish team, they have put
together this leaflet to distribute to parents. It’s always a difficult
one this. How do you encourage people, and be clear about some of the
expectations and boundaries within the Liturgy, without creating a list
of pharisaical rules or being unsympathetic to the huge struggles of
parents and families.

 

This seems like an honourable try to me. What do you think? Any
comments or suggestions in the comments box please, and then you can
help my friend develop this as it goes along.

 

For parents at Mass with babies, toddlers or children

The presence of so many parents at Mass with their babies and children is a real blessing for our parish. It shows how vibrant, joyful and alive our community is. Seeing so many families really warms my heart and gives me great hope for the future. So, a huge “thank you” to all parents with children who faithfully come to Mass. You are, indeed, the first and best teachers of your children in the ways of faith. You are doing a great job.

Sometimes parents ask me about what is the best thing to do if their baby or child is behaving in a way that is distracting to others. Having asked the advice of parents, priests and other parishioners, here are some ideas and practical tips that might help and support you:

1. Talk to your children about the parish church. This is a special place because Jesus is there. When we come into God’s house, this is “quiet time” where we speak to Jesus, our friend, in our hearts, as well, as with our prayers and songs.

2. Weekly Mass attendance is important. When attendance is irregular, broken or happens rarely, then it is more difficult for our children to develop the ways of behaving that are appropriate at Mass.

3. When you come into the church, why not bless your child with holy water or, if they are old enough, allow them do it themselves and learn to make the sign of the Cross? These simple rituals will help your child to appreciate that they are in God’s House.

4. Try to get to Mass a little ahead of time, so that you can settle your child for this “quiet time” with Jesus. If parents are rushing into the church at the last moment or arriving late, this is almost impossible to do. It can also be distracting for other parishioners who are trying to prepare themselves spiritually for Mass.

If we are flustered and distracted, our children will pick up on this. If we all work to create a prayerful and composed atmosphere in the church, this will help our children.

A little time before Mass spent preparing your child for the “quiet, special time” with Jesus will help them to understand that the church is a different place to their homes, the park or the school playground. It will help them to distinguish between ways of behaving that are appropriate to different places and circumstances.

Maybe you could kneel down together and say a simple prayer? You might read or get your child to read the words of the opening hymn and reflect on it? Or just sit, bow your heads and offer thirty seconds of quiet time to God?

5. At the church we have a family room where parents can take their children if they are very unsettled. Please make good use of it.

6. We all need to be sensible about noise at Mass. After all, this is public worship with children. But, we all need to be aware of where we are, the sacred things we are taking part in and to have a real respect for those around us. So, don’t rush to take your child out if there is some very “light” noise or murmuring, but if a baby is crying or a child’s behaviour is disruptive, take them to the family room, go into the lobby or, weather permitting, have a wander outside the church.

7. Some parents find sitting between their children helpful, especially if their children talk or tease each other.

8. Walking toddlers around the church during Mass can be distracting for the priest and the congregation. If your toddler is restless then take them for a wander outside the main body of the church.

9. One of the toilets has a changing table for babies if parents need to change nappies. Older children should be encouraged to go to the toilet before they come to Mass. Children going back and forth to the toilet disrupts a prayerful atmosphere.

10. If your child needs distracting give them a “soft” toy or for older children, colouring or religious books. Bunches of keys or “hard” toys made of plastic or metal being shaken, squeaked or banged on the floor can become very distracting. Why not put together a “Jesus” bag or rucksack that has a couple of things in them and becomes part of the weekly preparation for going to Mass?

11. It is perfectly acceptable to bottle feed infants or to give your child a drink of water, but the use of food snacks should be kept to a minimum.

12. Parents must consume the Body of Christ when they receive Holy Communion and NOT give it to their children to play with or eat.

13. After Mass finishes, why not visit the Blessed Sacrament Chapel with your child? If they are old enough, teach them to genuflect before the tabernacle and to light a candle. Then, give them a few moments in “quiet time” thanking Jesus for his friendship and love. These rituals will help your child to appreciate that the Mass is where we meet Jesus in a very special way.

14. After Mass, make sure you bring your children to high-five or say “hello” to the priest or deacon.

15. Coffee and juice are available after the “Family” Mass – this is a good way for parents to get to know each other and for children to make new friendships.

16. Can we strike a balance between an appropriate firmness so that our children learn proper behaviour at Mass and also a certain “light-heartedness”? If our children are to love their Catholic Faith, I think we can.

All families and children are welcome here in the parish church. I thank every one of them for being part of the life of our marvellous parish community.

3rd quarter of 16th century

3rd quarter of 16th century (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

May God richly bless and protect you and your children.

 

 

 

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3 Comments

  1. August 19, 2013 at 7:40 pm

    Sounds like a very balanced piece of advice.

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  2. dmelloalex said,

    August 19, 2013 at 8:17 pm

    Good suggestions, hope people follow. before anything the faithfuls should understand to maintain the sanctity of the Holy place. Why rush to the next door Blessed sacrament chapel immediately after the mass when Jesus is present in the Blessed sacrament inside the church?

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  3. August 20, 2013 at 8:11 am

    When I was a youngster, (which was eons ago), my parents made me understand that Sunday Mass was a great happening, joy and privilege in my life, which would bring me closer and closer to JESUS.
    We went to Church dressed in our “Sunday BEST”; not like those who are obscenely rich in worldly terms but come to Church like ” what the cat brought in “; yet these horrors will tog up to the teeth when they have to go to a society party, and here they come to the greatest celebration of all like dishevelled urchins.
    Whilst I agree that the tips given here are worthy, I firmly believe that preaching by example is still the best way. So parents, show your kids, what is proper by your own example and behaviour.

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